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Pupil Performance data & Assessment

Primary assessment codes and additional information about Key Stage 1 & 2 SATs 2016

A marked improvement? A review of the evidence on written marking by the Education Endowment Fund APRIL 2016

Churchend School Results 2016

 

EYFS

 

Churchend

National

Good Level of Development

71.7%

69.3%

 

Phonics Screening

 

Churchend

National

Working at Expected Level

95%

81%

 

End of Key Stage 1

Attainment - Test

 

Reading

Writing

Maths

 

Sch

NA

Sch

Na

Sch

Na

Not Standard

20%

36%

17%

34%

20%

21%

At Standard

80%

74%

83%

66%

80%

79%

At greater depth

40%

24%

23%

13%

37%

18%

 

End of Key Stage 2

Attainment - Test

 

Reading

Writing

Maths

SPAG

R/W/M

 

Sch

NA

Sch

Na

Sch

Na

Sch

Na

Sch

Na

Not Standard

16%

34%

9%

26%

12%

30%

12%

28%

21%

47%

At Standard

84%

66%

91%

74%

88%

70%

88%

72%

79%

53%

Higher Standard

47%

19%

35%

15%

44%

17%

51%

23%

28%

5%

 

Churchend children have once again achieved well across the board in relation to the national average. All children in EYFS made at least five steps of progress from nursery to the end of their reception year. Our phonics results have improved year on year since the tests began in 2013. Our children working at greater depth/higher standard have continued to be well above the national average in both KS1 and KS2. In reading/writing/maths combined, Churchend was the highest performing school in the local authority.
Please follow the Dfe link to the school performance tables including SATs results for 2016.

KS1 and KS2 teacher assessment and moderation guidance information for parents

Clarification: key stage 1 and 2 teacher assessment and moderation guidance DfE March 2016
The purpose of this document is to give schools and local authorities (LAs) a summary of recent changes and clarification about key stage 1 (KS1) and key stage 2 (KS2) tests, teacher assessments (TA) and LA moderation for 2016.
Teacher assessment submission date change
Dates for submission of KS1 and KS2 TA have been pushed back to 30 June 2016. This will allow schools additional time to gather evidence and finalise their TA judgements.
Clarification of the evidence required to support TA judgements at the end of a key stage
 The evidence must show that the pupil demonstrates attainment of all the ‘pupil can’ statements within the standard they have been awarded.
 The teacher must be confident the pupil meets the ‘pupil can’ statements in the preceding standards but there is no requirement to produce specific evidence for them. It is likely that the pupil’s work for the standard they have been awarded will also evidence the ‘pupil can’ statements of the preceding standard(s).
 There is no requirement to provide tick sheets for an LA external moderation visit.
 Schools are free to use their existing processes for teacher assessment and internal / external moderation.
Clarification of KS2 writing ‘working at the expected standard’ Morgan and Leigh examples
In the new system the threshold of the expected standard for KS2 is broadly equivalent to the previous level 4b, but pupils working at the expected standard will have a range of attainment.
The exemplification materials contain 2 examples of pupils who are ‘working at the expected standard’. These show the range of pupils that will be assessed in this standard.
 Morgan is a pupil with sufficient evidence for a TA judgement of ‘working at the expected standard’. This collection of work demonstrates how the expected standard is broadly equivalent to the old level 4b.
 Leigh is close to being awarded ‘working at greater depth’, but does not meet all of the ‘pupil can’ statements for that standard, and is therefore also judged as ‘working at the expected standard’.
To note, there has not been any statement that ‘working at greater depth’ is equivalent to level 5.
2
LA moderation process change
 LA external moderation is a supportive process with the LA moderator reviewing a sample of pupils’ work as representative of the cohort and then holding a professional dialogue with teachers to confirm that teacher assessment standards are being applied appropriately by the school. As a result of this process, local authorities may require schools to amend teacher judgements for individual pupils if it is determined that judgements are not in line with national standards.
 Your LA will tell your school if you are going to get a moderation visit on or after 20 May 2016. LAs will carry out moderation visits from 23 May to 30 June 2016. Schools will receive adequate notice of the visit.
 It may be the case that there are some pupils the school believes will demonstrate additional evidence before the TA submission date. This will be discussed as part of the moderation process. The school and LA can agree to re-moderate these pupils.
Clarification of handwriting and joined up/cursive handwriting for KS1 and KS2
 To be awarded ‘working towards’ or ‘working at expected’ standards, pupils do not need to demonstrate joined up handwriting.
 To be awarded ‘working at greater depth’ at the end of key stage 1, pupils must demonstrate joined up handwriting, using the diagonal and horizontal strokes needed to join letters in most of their writing, as well as all of the statements relating to handwriting in the preceding standards.
 To be awarded ‘working at greater depth’ at the end of key stage 2, pupils must meet all of the statements relating to handwriting in the preceding standards.
Clarification on the use of the exemplification materials for KS1 and KS2
If teachers are confident in their judgements, they do not need to refer to the exemplification materials. The exemplification materials are there to help teachers make their judgements where they want additional guidance.
Clarification on evidence for writing that is allowed as ‘working independently’
If writing evidence has been redrafted by the pupil, this is acceptable as independent work. The redrafted work may be in response to self, peer, or group evaluation, or after discussion with the teacher.
Pupils can also independently use classroom resources such as dictionaries, thesauruses, word banks, classroom displays, books or websites.
It would not be independent if the work was modelled or heavily scaffolded, copied or paraphrased or where the teacher has directed the pupil to change specific words or punctuation.
3
Clarification on exclamations for KS1 and KS2
The national curriculum states that an exclamation is one of the four forms of sentences. An exclamation must be introduced by a phrase with ‘what’ or ‘how’ and should be followed by a subject + verb + any other elements. It is typically demarcated by an exclamation mark, for example:
What big teeth you have, Grandma!
How beautiful Cinderella looks in that dress!
The definition of an exclamation should not be confused with the uses of the exclamation mark for punctuation. The exclamation mark can be used in a variety of sentence forms and not just in exclamations.
Pupils at KS1 who are ‘working at the expected’ and/or ‘working at greater depth’ standards must use sentences with different forms in their writing.
Clarification on the use of an exclamation mark for KS1 and KS2
An exclamation mark is a punctuation mark that can end statements, commands and exclamations, or be placed after a phrase or single word (eg an interjection). An exclamation mark shows that the writer wants to indicate a certain effect, such as heightened emotion eg ‘Be my friend!’ [command].
The use of an exclamation mark does not change a sentence into an exclamation.
Ofsted and Regional School Commissioners (RSCs) treatment of the interim TA frameworks – change
 As this is the first year of schools working with the new interim assessment frameworks, the Minister for Schools has written to the Chief Inspector asking him to ensure that Ofsted inspectors take into account national performance and contextual factors when considering a school's performance in writing at KS2, which is used as part of the floor standard.
 The Minister has also asked RSCs to be mindful of the impact of these new arrangements in making decisions about issuing warning notices and tackling underperformance following this year’s results.

Primary School Accountability: NAHT Guide to the Education & Adoption Bill MARCH 2016

Education secretary Nicky Morgan records video hitting back at critics of new primary assessments

Education secretary Nicky Morgan has recorded a Twitter video in which she hits back at criticism of the controversial new primary assessment regime.

In the three-minute video, she says: “Yes, we’ve reformed the primary accountability system and, no, we’re not downplaying the scale of that change.” But she adds that "some claims being made by the media and unions" are wrong.

 To view the video, please click on the link below:

https://www.tes.com/news/school-news/breaking-news/education-secretary-nicky-morgan-records-video-hitting-back-critics

The video comes after Mary Bousted, general secretary of the ATL teaching union, criticised the number of tick boxes in the government’s guidance on how to assess writing.

There has also been criticism from the NAHT headteachers’ union, which called for a “dramatic change” in the government’s plans and warned that it would “act to protect pupils and schools”, if this was not done. The NUT teaching union has also called for Sats to be suspended after claiming the system had “come apart at the seams”.

In May, 600,000 Year 6 pupils will be taking the first Sats in maths, reading and spelling, grammar and punctuation under the new primary curriculum, which was introduced in September 2014.

Relaxed assessment deadlines

There will also be teacher assessments of writing, but the exemplification materials for these assessments were published at the beginning of this month – and teachers said that the new expected standard they looked far closer to the old level 5 than the old level 4b, the target that teachers had expected students would have to reach.

In response to the NAHT ultimatum, education minister Nick Gibb last week relaxed the deadlines for the submission of teacher assessments, a move that would give Year 6 teachers an extra six weeks.

But the NAHT had also called for the floor standards to be suspended for one year.

And in today’s video, Ms Morgan makes it clear that the floor standards will remain in place. She said: “In December, a new floor standard and new attainment and progress measures will be published in the performance tables. We have already said that schools will be above the floor standard if 65 per cent of more of their pupils meet the expected standard in all of reading, writing and maths or if the school’s progress scores are sufficient.”

Schools minister Nick Gibb has u-turned on the date by which primary teachers must submit key stage 2 writing assessments after unions raised concerns.

In a letter to Russell Hobby, general secretary of the National Association of Head Teachers (NAHT), Mr Gibb today confirmed the decision.

Last year, schools had until the end of June to submit teacher assessment data for key stage 2 writing tests, but it was announced this year that the deadline would bebrough forward by a month.

Schools were concerned about the short timeframe in which the assessments had to be turned around after the SATs in May.

Today, however, Mr Gibb said “for this year only” he would “relax” the deadline.

It will also mean the deadline for key stage 1 assessment is re-instated to the end of June.

The NAHT met with Mr Gibb last week to discuss teachers’ concerns about the changes in primary assessment.

In his letter to Mr Hobby, Mr Gibb wrote: “The rationale for setting the earlier deadline this year was to ensure that all schools submit their teacher assessment data at the same time, after their own internal validation processes have been completed, but prior to any external moderation taking place. This move would mean fairer and more robust arrangements for the collection of teacher assessment data.

“However, I am prepared, for this year only, to relax the deadlines in recognition of the unique circumstance of teachers working with a new framework to new standards. I have asked the STA to amend their Assessment and Reporting Arrangements to reflect an amended deadline for KS1 and KS2 of 30 June and to communicate the change to all primary schools.”

Mr Gibb said he hoped this move would “allay teachers’ concerns” about workload and disruption and praised the NAHT for not using “the media to scaremonger”.

Mr Hobby said: “We’re pleased that the government has listened to headteachers’ feedback on writing assessment. Dialogue has led to some productive developments, which is exactly how these things should pan out. There are still areas of doubt to resolve and a bigger picture on primary assessment generally about which we are very concerned.”

Earlier this week, the National Union of Teachers called for the suspension of SATs this year because of their concerns about the framework changes.

This week, concerns were raised about the exemplification materials for writing and confusion over “exclamation sentences”, which schools were told must be a full sentence, include a verb, and start with “how” or “what”. Professionals said it wouldtake writing style back to the 19th century.

In response to this, Mr Gibb said he remained “committed” to “high standards” and the STA would review the documents at the end of the year.

Primary School Accountability in 2016- latest information from the DfE about how to assess pupil achievement (attainment and progress) from July 2016.

DfE Primary School Accountability: A Guide to what it means JAN 2016

New assessment arrangements for children at the end of Key Stage 2:

 

We thought you might find it interesting to see and explanation of how we believe progress and attainment are likely to be calculated and reported to parents from July 2016.Please follow the link below. If you have any further questions, please contact the Headteacher. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VyptCWMO3tI

 

Interim recommendations of the Rochford review. The Review of statutory assessment arrangements for pupils working below the standard of national curriculum tests is an independent review chaired by Diane Rochford.

Interim Teacher Assessment frameworks at the end of Key Stage 1

Interim teacher assessment frameworks at the end of Key Stage 2

NCER data timelines

GUIDE TO NEW ASSESSMENTS FOR SCHOOLS:

Reforms to Primary Assessment and Accountability

Department for Education

October 2015

Frequently asked questions:

Why were levels removed?

  • Levels were designed for the old national curriculum
  • They had unintended consequences for pedagogy
  • Teaching became guided by level descriptors rather than the curriculum
  • Levels encouraged pace over consolidation
  • They led to disproportionate focus on pupils just below the boundaries
  • The best fit model confused their meaning
  • This led to inconsistency in their application and confusion in their interpretation
  • They had only been intended for statutory assessment, but came to dominate classroom assessment too

 

The Purpose of Assessment

Statutory Assessment

  • To hold schools to account for the work they do with their pupils. To measure both attainment and progress to demonstrate schools’ effectiveness.

Formative Classroom Assessment

  • To inform teaching and learning.  Used diagnostically to evaluate knowledge and understanding, identify gaps and misconceptions and inform lesson planning accordingly.

 

The means of statutory assessment are determined by the Department. The means of formative assessment are determined by the school in line with curriculum freedoms.

Life after levels

Statutory Assessment

  • KS1 and KS2 new national curriculum tests with outcomes in the form of scaled scores
  • Teacher assessment at KS1 and KS2 using the interim framework for teacher assessment
  • Phonics screening check

Classroom Assessment

  • Determined by the school in line with their curriculum
  • Optional reception baseline

 

Reforms to Accountability

  • New floor standard
  • New way of measuring progress
  • New coasting schools measure
  • Changes to Ofsted’s expectations of classroom assessment

 

Key Messages of Accountability Reform

  • Strong accountability means high expectations for attainment at primary, so that all pupils leave ready to make a successful start in secondary school
  • But it also means celebrating schools doing well with disadvantaged intakes and challenging those not doing enough with high attaining intakes.
  • New fairer way of measuring progress at school level, comparing pupils with similar starting points

 

 

 

Scaled scores

  • Tests at the end of KS1 and at the end of KS2 will report in scaled scores
  • The expected standard will always be set at 100
  • The standard will be set by the profession – expert panels are involved in the development of all tests created by STA
  • Raw scores in the test will be converted to a scaled score
  • Pupils with 100 or more will have met the expected standard Pupils who score below 100 will not have met the standard
  • Anchor items will link the tests from one year to the next to ensure expected standards are consistent

 

Interim Framework for Teacher Assessment

  • For English reading, writing and mathematics at KS1 and for writing at KS2, there are 3 standards:
    • Working towards the expected standard
    • Working at the expected standard
    • Working at greater depth within the expected standard
  • For English reading and mathematics at KS 2 and for science, there is one standard (working at the expected standard)
  • Each of the 3 standards within the framework contains a number of ‘pupil can’ statements
  • teachers will need to have evidence that a pupil demonstrates attainment of all of the statements within that standard and all the statements in the preceding standard(s).

 

Reception Baseline

To enable progress to be measured from when a cohort of children start school

  • A teacher-administered, age-appropriate assessment conducted in the first half-term of a child starting in reception.
  • The reception baseline will measure progress from the start of school to the end of KS2
  • We will conduct a comparability study in autumn 2015

 

Assessment freedoms

  • At the end of key stages there will be an expected standard set. Between these points it is for schools to decide how best to assess their pupils in a way that best suits their needs.

 

Schools will be expected to select an assessment approach which:

  • Aligns well with their curriculum
  • Sets out what pupils are expected to know, understand and do, and when
  • Explains pupils’ progress and attainment to parents
  • Can be used to set aspirational targets and wherever possible supports pupils to reach the expected standards

 

What does the Commission report say?

  • Explains the purposes of assessment and principles to support schools in developing effective systems of assessment
  • Explains how assessment without levels can better serve the needs of pupils and teachers.
  • Provides guidance to help schools create assessment policies
  • Clarifies the role that assessment without levels will play in the Ofsted inspection process.
  • Provides examples of what good practice looks like
  • Provides advice on how ITT and CPD can support assessment without levels.
  • Provides advice to the Government on ensuring that appropriate provision is made for pupils with SEN.

 

Expert Review of Pupils Working Below the Standard of the National Curriculum Tests

  • Advise on a solution for statutory assessment of pupils working below the standard of national curriculum tests;
  • Consider how P-Scales fit with the wider approach to assessment and advise on whether they need to be revised in light of the new national curriculum;
  • Consider the impact of assessment and qualification reform at key stage 4 to ensure continuity and consistency with any proposed changes to assessment of lower-attaining pupils at KS1-3;
  • Consider the wider implications of any recommendations they make, including any professional development needs that might arise.

What does this mean for schools?

  • Last year’s Y2 and Y6 were the last cohorts to be assessed on the old national curriculum & receive an end of Key Stage ‘level’
  • Schools should have begun selecting or developing and implementing an approach to assessment which aligns with their curriculum
  • Most schools will have selected a baseline assessment for use from September

 

Accountability reforms: floor standard 

The new accountability system reflects the raised expectations of primary schools and recognises the excellent work they do.

In 2016, a school will be below the floor standard if:

  • Fewer than 65% of pupils achieve the expected standard and
  • Pupils fail to make sufficient progress in any of reading, writing and mathematics. 

 

A school below the floor is a reason for significant concern which the LA or RSC would investigate. Ofsted may also inspect the school earlier. 

 

Accountability reforms: school progress measure

  • Progress will now be a value-added measure rather than an ‘expected levels of progress’ measure.
  • A pupil’s KS2 score is measured against the average KS2 score for pupils nationally having the same prior attainment.
  • KS1 baseline is worked out by creating a combined score of all teacher assessment outcomes.
  • Until 2020, the KS1 APS is calculated in the same way but using levels.
  • A school’s progress score will be calculated as the mean average of its pupils’ progress scores, so it will show whether overall pupils make above or below average progress compared to similar pupils in other schools.

 

 

Progress measure how does it work?

                         
 
 
   
     
     
 
 
     
  • He got 1 point more than the average for those with similar starting points = +1
 
 
 
 
   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other forms of accountability

As now, there will continue to be other accountability measures for primary schools beyond the floor standard 

  • Performance tables: headline measures will be:
    • Average progress made by pupils in reading, writing and mathematics
    • Percentage of pupils achieving the expected standard in reading, writing and maths at end of Key Stage 2
    • Average score of pupils in their Key Stage 2 assessments
    • Percentage of pupils who achieve a high score in all areas at the end of key stage 2

 

  • Inspection – new short inspections for good schools

 

New approach to coasting schools

  • Floor standard identifies those schools that are failing to provide an acceptable level of performance in any one year
  • The Government is also committed to identifying those schools where pupils do not fulfil their potential
  • Education and Adoption Bill (2015) - new category of schools
  • Subject to passage of the Bill, in 2016 a school will be in this category if it is below these levels in all three of these years. 
    • 2014 – fewer than 85% of pupils achieve L4+ and pupils failed to make expected progress, and
    • 2015 – fewer than 85% of pupils achieve L4+ and pupils failed to make expected progress, and
    • 2016 – fewer than 85% of pupils achieve the new higher expected standard and pupils fail to make sufficient progress.

 

What does this mean for schools?

  • While the floor standard remains at 65%, schools will need to aim for at least 65% to achieve the higher national standard
  • Schools will need to ensure they take steps to ensure all pupils are making good progress, not just those at the thresholds (as VA is a relative measure there will be no ‘target’ for progress)

Floor standards 2014-16

The school performance measures are compared against the threshold levels in pupils’ attainment and/or progress (i.e. floor/minimum standards). Schools and colleges that do not meet the standards may face a number of potential challenges and interventions from central or local government, depending on the perceived level of under-performance. In some cases, a school might receive a written warning from the government. In others, it might be subject to an inspection by Ofsted, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted). In the most extreme cases, the head teacher might be removed or the school faced with closure and replacement by an academy.

The government also uses the floor/minimum standards as one of the ways to raise standards and encourage schools/colleges to improve the quality of education. The standards have changed over time to reflect the government’s intention to set more ambitious expectations for what schools and colleges should achieve.

Detailed information about floor/minimum expected standards and performance measure since 2012 can be downloaded via this link.

Here are the floor/minimum standards for primary, secondary, and 16-19 phases in years 2014-2016:

Primary schools

2014 and 2015

Floor standards changed in 2014 so that schools will be seen as underperforming in 2014 and 2015 if:

  • fewer than 65% of pupils at the end of key stage 2 (KS2) achieved level 4 or above in reading, writing and maths and
  • the school has a below median score (94% in 2014) for the percentage of pupils at the end of KS2 who made expected progress in reading and
  • the school has a below median score (96% in 2014) for the percentage of pupils at the end of KS2 who made expected progress in Writing and
  • the school has a below median score (93% in 2014) for the percentage of pupils at the end of KS2 who made expected progress in maths

Results of English grammar, punctuation and spelling tests will not be taken into account in floor standards.

2016

Schools will be above the floor if pupils make sufficient progress across all of reading, writing and mathematics or if more than 65% of them achieve the national standard in reading, writing and mathematics.

Sufficient progress will be calculated using as a value-added measure from KS1 to KS2. The precise level of ‘sufficient progress’ will not be set until the first new KS2 tests are sat in summer 2016.

Coasting schools – DFE definition

Government sets out the definition of a 'coasting' school.

Nicky Morgan

Hundreds of coasting schools will be targeted for improvement after Education Secretary Nicky Morgan unveiled a new measure which for the first time will identify those schools which are failing to push every pupil to reach their potential.

These schools, which have been deemed to be ‘coasting’ for a number of years, will be offered help from the best education experts in the country to improve their results and will be required to produce a clear plan for improvement.

The government’s regional schools commissioners - 8 education experts with in-depth local insight supported by elected head teacher boards from the local community - will then assess whether or not the school has a credible plan to improve and ensure all children make the required progress. Those that can improve will be supported to do so by our team of expert heads, and those that cannot will be turned into academies under the leadership of our expert school sponsors - one of the best ways of improving underperforming schools.

The new measure will be introduced through the Education and Adoption Bill and sets out a clear definition of what a ‘coasting’ school is.

Schools eligible for intervention will be those which fall below a new ‘coasting’ level for 3 years.

In 2014 and 2015 that level will be set at 60% of pupils achieving 5 good GCSEs or an above-average proportion of pupils making acceptable progress. From 2016, the level will be set based on Progress 8 - our new accountability measure, which shows how much progress pupils in a particular school make between the end of primary school and their GCSEs.

At primary level, the definition will apply to those schools who have seen fewer than 85% of children achieving an acceptable secondary-ready standard in reading, writing and maths over the course of 3 years, and who have seen insufficient pupil progress.

The announcement comes on the day the National Audit Office highlights the pupil premium - extra funding given to schools to help disadvantaged pupils fulfil their potential - has led to schools dramatically improving their focus on improving the life chances of disadvantaged pupils. The report finds 94% of school leaders surveyed now target support to these pupils - compared to just 57% before the introduction of the pupil premium.

Education Secretary Nicky Morgan said:

Our one nation approach is very much about making sure children are being properly supported to achieve their best in school. But for too long a group of ‘coasting’ schools, many in leafy areas with more advantages than schools in disadvantaged communities, have fallen beneath the radar.

I’m unapologetic about shining a spotlight on complacency and I want the message to go out loud and clear, that education isn’t simply about pushing children over an artificial borderline, but instead about stretching every pupil to unlock their potential and give them the opportunity to get on in life. I know that schools and teachers will rise to the challenge, and the extra support we’ll offer to coasting schools will help them do just that.

The measure is expected to help hundreds of schools that previously fell beneath the radar - which could be because they have high-attaining intakes, or focused on getting lots of pupils over the C/D borderline. These schools previously would not have been spotted, as they do not fall beneath the government’s strict exam results floor standards and may not have received negative Ofsted reports.

Today’s announcement comes in the week that the 5,000th independent state-funded school (which could be an academy, free school, studio school or university technical college) opens. This is up from just 203 in 2010 – signalling the government’s drive to give parents more choice of a good local school, while tackling underperformance in all areas of the country.

The announcement also comes on the day that the Academies Annual Report for the 2013/14 academic year provides clear and credible evidence of the positive impact academies are having on young people’s life chances, it finds:

  • established sponsored academies have GCSE results well above those of their predecessor schools, even under new and tougher measures: 6.4 percentage points higher after 4 years, compared to 1.3 percentage points in non-academies
  • sponsored primary academies improve their test results at more than double the rate of non-academies: 9 percentage points compared to 4 percentage points after 2 years
  • results for pupils on free school meals improve faster in primary sponsored academies than in other schools
  • sponsored academies are increasing the number of pupils studying the EBacc package of rigorous academic qualifications at a faster rate than non-academies
  • almost three-quarters (72%) of academies support other schools that they did not support pre-conversion

The government recently announced plans to tackle failing schools by introducing a new measure to turn all schools rated ‘inadequate’ by Ofsted into academies. The move is expected to help a further 1,000 schools between now and 2020 improve by sweeping away bureaucratic and legal loopholes that previously prevented schools from being transformed.

Notes to editors

  1. For secondary schools, a school will be ‘coasting’ if in 2014 and 2015 fewer than 60% of children achieve 5 A* to C including English and mathematics and they are below the median level of expected progress and in 2016 they fall below a level set against the new progress 8 measure. This level will be set after 2016 results are available to ensure it is set at a suitable level. A school will have to be below those levels in all 3 years to be defined as ‘coasting’. By 2018 the definition of ‘coasting’ will be based entirely on Progress 8 and will not have an attainment element.
  2. At primary level the definition will apply to those schools who for the first 2 years have seen fewer than 85% of children achieving level 4, the secondary-ready standard, in reading, writing and maths, and which have also seen below-average proportions of pupils making expected progress between age 7 and age 11, followed by a year below a ‘coasting’ level set against the new accountability regime which will see children being expected to achieve a new higher expected standard and schools being measured against a new measure of progress.
  3. The ‘coasting’ definition will capture performance in 2014, 2015 and 2016. Therefore we will not know until 2016 how many schools will be captured within the definition. However, based on current performance we expect the definition to apply to hundreds of schools.
  4. Secondary schools currently fall beneath the government’s floor standards if fewer than 40% of children achieve 5 or more A* to C GCSEs, including English and maths, and if the proportion of pupils making expected progress between key stage 2 and 4 in English and maths is below the median. Primary schools are considered below the floor standards if fewer than 65% of children achieve level 4 in reading, writing and maths, and if the proportion of pupils making expected progress between key stage 1 and key stage 2 in reading, writing and maths is below the median.

 

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